Railroad Tycoon II: Gold Edition (1999 - PC, reviewed by EnOb)

Although released in 1999, I did not purchase this game until 2001. At that time it could not run on my elite computer, and with that, I was not able to play Railroad Tycoon II: Gold Edition (RRT2GE) until 2003. Upon upgrading I eagerly opened the package and started my adventure as a tycoon.

After a few hours running routes all around the Midwest I came to the conclusion that I was a horrible tycoon. The game in fact was rather difficult and confusing.

Though a little misleading, the game is not as action packed as the title concludes, but do not let this sim game pass out of reach. It is a must have for all simmers.

Along the lines of all classic sim game, one surely cannot master the life of a railroad tycoon within a few hours. This is a life lesson one can bring and use in "real life", not like those other lousy tycoon games, i.e. Monopoly. This game takes time to master, and time is all you have these days.

Game Play


The game play is fairly straight forward, nothing too tricky. Click here, click there, it is all about the mouse.

The game itself although, is probably one of the hardest, most challenging games I have ever come across. In fact, I have played it every now and then since 2003 and I do not think I have ever won without cheating. It is just damn hard.

You are placed in an above ground view which enables you to lay tracks across vast stretches of countryside, linking major urban areas and resource developing sections together, in hopes of bringing supplies to the demand. Once one can sort of boggle this idea into their mind, it becomes fairly straight forward, yet not easier.

The game has a number of excellent options for choosing how to play. There are various campaigns and scenarios ranging in difficulty. There is also a multiplayer mode and an area where you can develop your own maps and create a personal scenario.

Graphics


For a straightforward game, the graphics are not meant to be dazzling. The beginning has a sweet scene with a giant locomotive barreling down at you. Besides this epic clip, and other small short clip videos taken from historic footage, the game itself is rather basic. And yes, things are not to scale, there is no way a train could be as big as a city, but what can you do?

Sound


By removing the CD, all sound is instantly stopped. Though a catchy tune picks up in the beginning, the constant train whistles and other assorted train noises, not to mention the occasional banjo strum, can irritate one to the point of cursing loudly like a sailor in a storm.

Presentation


Everything is set up in a classic 19th century feel, back when the train was a novel thing. It makes the game have even more nostalgia, bringing us back to the day of the mighty Cleveland station steamers.

Closing Comments


You bought a game that is about building a railway...what did you really expect?

4.5/7 Yannis:



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